LIBRARY HOURS
Mon-Thur 9am - 9pm
Friday 12pm - 5pm
Saturday 9am - 5pm
Sunday Closed

Created Equal: America's Civil Rights Struggle

"Created Equal" is part of the Bridging Cultures initiative to encourage public conversation about the changing meanings of freedom and equality in America.

The Created Equal film set and public programs have been made possible by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

 

loving story

Screening and Discussion of

The Loving Story

Monday, September 9, 2013
Calvert Library Prince Frederick

Mildred and Richard Loving knew it was technically illegal for them to live as a married couple in Virginia because she was of African American and Native American descent and he was white. But they never expected to be woken up in their bedroom and arrested one night in 1958. The documentary brings to life the Loving’s marriage and the legal battle that followed through little-known filmed interviews and photographs shot for Life magazine. Trailer.

6:30pm
   
ace of broken hearts

Community Dialogue
Rights, Freedoms & Responsibilities: Exploring Our Own Struggles with What “Created Equal” Really Means

Monday, September 23, 2013
Registration required)
Calvert Library Prince Frederick

Join us for a public conversation and community engagement program exploring identity, stereotypes, and diversity. Reflect on how you perceive others, how you are perceived by others, and what you understand about yourself. This event is also the kickoff for Defying Definitions, a collaborative project of the Maryland Humanities Council, the Maryland Commission on Civil Rights, the Community Mediation Center of Calvert County and other community partners. Flyer for Defying Definitions series.

6pm
   
fist with microphone

Screening and Discussion of

Freedom Riders

Monday, September 30, 2013
Calvert Library Prince Frederick

Attracting a diverse group of volunteers—black and white, young and old, male and female, secular and religious, northern and southern—the Freedom Rides of 1961 took the civil rights struggle out of the courtroom and onto the streets of the Jim Crow South. Freedom Riders tells the terrifying, moving, and suspenseful story of a time when white and black volunteers riding a bus into the Deep South risked being jailed, beaten, or killed, as white local and state authorities ignored or encouraged violent attacks. The film includes previously unseen amateur 8-mm footage of the burning bus on which some Freedom Riders were temporarily trapped, taken by a local twelve-year-old and held as evidence since 1961 by the FBI. Freedom Riders website and trailer.



6pm
   
fist with microphone

Meet the Author

Simeon & Carol Booker

Monday, October 7, 2013
Calvert Library Prince Frederick

Simeon Booker is a 94-year-old acclaimed journalist who covered the U.S. civil rights movement from its earliest days. He was a correspondent for Jet and Ebony and the first black staff reporter on the Washington Post.
Booker and his wife Carol McCabe Booker wrote Shocking the Conscience: A Reporter’s Account of the Civil Rights Movement, which has been described as “a searing and eye-opening memoir.” According to Donald Graham, chairman of the Washington Post, “Simeon Booker was there when Emmett Till’s mother first opened his casket and saw his disfigured face. He was on the bus when the first Freedom Riders rode into Alabama…his book is outstanding—sharp writing to equal his brave reporting.” Copies of the book will be available for purchase and signing.


6:30pm
   
fist with microphone

Screening and Discussion of

The Abolitionists, part 1

Tuesday, October 22, 2013
Calvert Library Southern Branch

The Abolitionists vividly brings to life the struggles of the men and women who led the battle to end slavery. Through innovative use of reenactments, this three-episode series puts a face on the anti-slavery movement—or rather, five faces: William Lloyd Garrison, impassioned New England newspaper editor; Frederick Douglass, former slave, author, and activist; Angelina Grimké, daughter of a rich South Carolina slaveholder; Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of the enormously influential Uncle Tom’s Cabin; and John Brown, ultimately executed for his armed seizure of the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry. The Abolitionists website and trailer.



6pm
   
fist with microphone

Screening and Discussion of

Slavery by Another Name

Monday, November 4, 2013
Calvert Library Prince Frederick

It was a shocking reality that often went unacknowledged, then and now: a huge system of forced, unpaid labor, mostly affecting Southern black men, that lasted until World War II. Based on the Pulitzer Prize–winning book by Douglas Blackmon, Slavery by Another Name tells the stories of men, charged with crimes like vagrancy, and often guilty of nothing, who were bought and sold, abused, and subjected to sometimes deadly working conditions as unpaid convict labor. Interviews with the descendants of victims and perpetrators resonate with a modern audience. Christina Comer, who discovered how her family profited from the system, says that “the story is important no matter how painful the reality is.” Slavery by Another Name website and trailer.




6:30pm
   
fist with microphone

Screening and Discussion of

The Abolitionists, part 2

Tuesday, November 12, 2013
Calvert Library Southern Branch

The Abolitionists vividly brings to life the struggles of the men and women who led the battle to end slavery. Through innovative use of reenactments, this three-episode series puts a face on the anti-slavery movement—or rather, five faces: William Lloyd Garrison, impassioned New England newspaper editor; Frederick Douglass, former slave, author, and activist; Angelina Grimké, daughter of a rich South Carolina slaveholder; Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of the enormously influential Uncle Tom’s Cabin; and John Brown, ultimately executed for his armed seizure of the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry. The Abolitionists website and trailer.



6pm
   
fist with microphone

Community Dialogue

Exploring What Freedom and Equality Mean Today

Monday, December 2, 2013
Calvert Library Prince Frederick

What do you think freedom and equality mean in today’s society? What have you experienced in this regard?



6:30pm